Just a Minute!

We don’t have the money to produce a professional “freedom minute” so we are asking you to take “just a minute!” and learn the facts. 

https://vimeo.com/143351101

Here’s what we keep hearing – “families have more choices now.” Well, that’s just not true. Only one charter school was approved in the past two years and one neighborhood school closed.

  • Jeffco has 155 schools:
    • 90 Elementary schools, a mix of K-6 and K-8
    • 20 Middle Schools (3 counted are K-8)
    • 17 High Schools (6 offer Internat’l Baccalaureate programs)
    • 16 G/T (Gifted and Talented Centers ranging K-12)
    • 19 Charter Schools
    • 13 Option Schools: 2 of which are Virtual (On-line) Academies; 2 Warren Tech Campuses
    • 29 Special programs and schools ranging from Stem schools to Adult night classes.

The board has approved one new charter school in the two years they have served.  This school, Golden View Classical Academy, requested an unprecedented 17 waivers, including a waiver from the district’s bullying policy.

 

More students are graduating.

 

And some of the nation’s best schools are right here in Jefferson County

 

They asked people to call the Jeffco School Board and tell them how great they are. We are asking you to call and tell the Board Majority the truth; they’re not doing a good job. But because the district staff is being used in this way for show, we ask that you thank the district staff for taking their jobs seriously and supporting Jeffco kids.   (303-982-6801)

 

http://www.usnews.com/education/best-high-schools/articles/how-us-news-calculated-the-rankings

This third step measured which schools produced the best college-level achievement for the highest percentages of their students. This was done by computing a College Readiness Index based on the school’s AP or IB participation rate – the number of 12th-grade students in the 2012-2013 academic year who took at least one AP or IB test before or during their senior year, divided by the number of 12th-graders – and how well the students did on those tests.

The latter part, called the quality-adjusted AP or IB participation rate, is the number of 12th-grade students in the 2012-2013 academic year who took and passed – received an AP score of 3 or higher or an IB score of 4 or higher – at least one of the tests before or during their senior year, divided by the number of 12th-graders at that school. Any individual AP or IB subject test was considered when determining if a student took or passed at least one test.

For the College Readiness Index, the quality-adjusted participation rate was weighted 75 percent in the calculation and the simple AP or IB participation rate was weighted 25 percent. The test that was taken by the most students at a particular school – either AP or IB – was used to calculate that school’s College Readiness Index.